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Talking Pop Canadianisms and Confronting the Enormity of the Landscape, in Canadian Art

Typically the ‘art season’ runs September to June, typically my art season as an independent self-representing artist runs the whole year, minus a couple weeks around Christmas holidays. This year I decided to book a month on the Hawaiian Island of Maui in August, and re-connect with nature and nurture my artists’ senses. It was a great adventure and one that will bleed into my work, with many posts about my trip to follow. August was a busy month for me while most of the Art World lay dormant. I finished some paintings, sold some art, showed my work in a Toronto gallery, and spoke with a popular Art magazine in New York City about my paintings of the last decade.

Whitehot Magazine is a one of the leading online art magazines in the world, based in NYC, with contributing arts writers and art historians from all over the world, interviewing artists worldwide. In August, I had the great pleasure of speaking with Andrea Bell, a NYC art historian, critic and writer. Based in New York City, Andrea teaches Art History and Criticism at Parsons School of Design. Bell is a contributing writer for Whitehot Magazine and we spoke about; mountains, Canadianisms, pop culture, and the People of Canada Portrait Project.

 

Excerpt from the article; “In her most recent work, Saturley has turned once again to the landscape, never really having left. Her new, visionary paintings collage different, unexpected elements of Canadiana rendered in her characteristic pop aesthetic. They oscillate between a graphic realism used for Canada’s famous mountain peaks or views of forest lakes, and the abstractness of the colorful, even psychedelic backgrounds. The sincerity of their celebration keeps them from tripping over into kitsch. Instead they are otherworldly and transportive, playful and humorous. Confronting the enormity of the landscape has become a crucial aspect in Canadian identity, and a thread that is woven throughout Saturley’s work. The “Canadianisms” series has already toured in both Edmonton and Calgary, and has garnered the artist notoriety as the voice of Canadian Pop Art.” read full article here.

 

Featured On Forbes – Canadian Artists On NYC Art Collectors Radar

Ten years ago I was fortunate enough to bid adieu to my day job and concentrate fully on nothing but my career as a contemporary Canadian artist. Thankful for this opportunity and mindful of the responsibility it carried, I was up for the challenge and ready to take on the art world. In the past ten years I have connected with many arts professionals around the world, thanks to the ability the Internet affords me to move from a local platform to a world wide market. Through these connections, I have found support and interest in my artwork. Whether it be curators, art gallery owners, publishers, art bloggers, art collectors or fellow artists. I am thankful to those who have been interested in my work and willing to support and share my paintings through their various networks, on and off-line.

My contemporary paintings of Canada; the nature, landscapes, people, popular culture and sports icons, have found their way into art lovers hearts across the country and even worldwide. These paintings of Canada have been featured in Our Canada Magazine, CBC Arts, AllHabs Magazine, Curry’s Canada, Visual Overture, Art Avenue Magazine, and Galleries West Magazine, to name a few. This past week I was fortunate enough to add that New York staple for business and financial news, Forbes.com. Through contributor Jason T. Borbet, I found my work among many of my favorite artists in the Art Business pages of the popular New York staple of the Wall Street set. The feature story; Price Ranges And Studio Images Of 20 Contemporary Artists, the third installment of this popular feature on the Forbes website. I was happy to see one other Canadian artist in the group, the Toronto based artist, K.I.A. whose work involves slicing 2 and 3D shapes into linear component parts, with subsequent reinterpretations of the source material. One of my favorite pieces shows a totem pole like figure, titled ‘injunjetenjun’ which he describes as a “jet engine totem pole, or a Haida space shuttle. A blueprint of a jet engine, done in the manner of west-coast aboriginal art (Haida.)”

Update: November 7, 2017

Since this article in Forbes was published Ms. Saturley’s work has increased in value. For more information about current pricing for the artwork of Brandy Saturley please visit the ‘Collect’ page on this website.

Brandy Saturley in studio – Forbes Magazine 2015